Friday Five Roundup: From dental research to cognitive computing for marketing

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The Star

Becoming a Dentist in B.C. Now Costs More Than 500 Root Canals



Annual numbers released by Statistics Canada confirmed that university tuition is still on the rise across the country. Domestic students starting degree programs this fall are spending an average of $220 more than their peers who started the previous year and $2,901 more than they would have spent a decade ago. But in no other undergraduate discipline is the cost as high or the increase as sharp as it is for dentistry.

Read the article on thestar.com>

2
Content Marketing Institute

How to Make Your Content Stand Out in a Crowded, Global Marketplace


If you want results with less effort – and it makes sense for your audiences – think about localized markets. After all, while people may speak English as a second or third language, they’re more likely to search in their native or first language.

Read the article on contentmarketinginstitute.com>

Friday Five Roundup: From regrowing dental tissue to social media trends

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Oral Health Group

Regrowing Dental Tissue With Stem Cells From Baby Teeth



New results of a clinical trial suggest that there is a more promising path for children with injuries resulting in a dead tooth: Using stem cells extracted from the patient’s baby teeth.

Read the article on oralhealthgroup.com>

2
Forbes

Five Social Media Trends That Will Impact Digital Advertising


Social media has become a critical ingredient to every advertiser’s marketing mix. Gone are the days in which social media was simply used for product discovery and awareness. Today, social media marketing plays an increasingly important role in driving intent and conversion within the consumer journey. But the world of social media is dynamic and in constant change.

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Friday Five Roundup: digital marketing transformations to winning the game of dental marketing

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Dental Economics

How to Win the Game of Dental Marketing



Are you a pawn in the game of dental marketing? Or are you a powerful king? This month, find out by playing dental marketing chess.

Read the article on dentaleconomics.com>

2
Forbes

The Three Keys To Digital Marketing Transformation


Digital transformation means a lot of things to different people. In its simplest form, it is the ongoing pursuit of achieving the highest levels of scale, efficiency, innovation and profit using data and technology. In the context of strategy and operations, I have found three keys to effective digital marketing transformation.

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Making Your Website Secure with HTTPS


By: Caitlin Barbin and Oren Baum


Google has been pushing for secure sites and if you haven't done so already, now is the time to switch. If you've noticed the Chrome address bar, it displays whether the site you are on is "secure" or "not secure." This started with Chrome's July 2018 update, and coming this September and October 2018, Google will remove the "secure" marking for sites that are encrypted with HTTPS. Instead, non-secure sites will be marked with "not secure" and this marking will turn red when users enter information such as an email or password.

This is an evolution in the practice of whether or not we need to consider a website secure or not. Encryption is used to avoid eavesdropping by any parties between the web browser and servers handling the information. In ‘the old days’, it was practice that only sites that dealt with secure information or e-commerce needed to be encrypted. Previously, such a label was reserved for websites that, for example, had their encryption certificate expire, or not match the domain a user visited.For many reasons, most of them considered positive, best practices have been moving in the direction that all websites should be secured with encryption. In order to help nudge that mindset in the right direction, Google, through its chrome browser, started labeling sites without encryption as 'insecure'. Google also modified their search ranking algorithm, to give preference to sites that are encrypted over those that are not. Together these and other 'carrot and stick' initiatives help move the bar of what is considered a safe, optimized, and protected website.

HTTP and HTTPS Explained

HTTP stands for HyperText Transfer Protocol and it moves information in plain text between your browser and the web server. Anyone who intercepts this transfer of information can read the plain text, making it insecure. It’s important to keep sensitive data such as passwords and credit cards on websites. HyperText Transfer Protocol Secure (HTTPS) was introduced where an encryption protocol called Secure Socket Layer (SSL) was combined with HTTP, making sites secure. However HTTPS does not protect you from everything such as hacks or hiding your identity — it just makes transferring data safer.